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Nottingham’s Hospitals during World War One

 

Nottm's Hospitals during ww1

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Upon the outbreak of war, 102 beds were immediately placed at the disposal of the military authorities. The Jubilee Wing was soon full of sick and wounded soldiers and further hospital expansion became necessary. In 1915 temporary wards to accommodate 150 casualties were built on the front lawn. The complement of beds at the Cedars was increased to 50 for less serious cases. Broxtowe House, which still serves the hospital as a home for resident medical staff, was bought for £547. The Thornton family house in the Ropewalk was given to the hospital and the Red Cross provided additional equipment and nurses. Another temporary building for a further 53 beds was erected in 1917 – with the War Office and Mr W.G. Player sharing the cost. The huts were soon in use, heated by six large stoves provided by Mr W.G. Player who afterwards added a balcony to accommodate 20 more patients. Despite the great influx of war casualties, the number of civilian patients remained at the pre-war level of 219. The various ambulance corps did fine work in transporting patients to and from the hospital. As well as terrible wounds, the sick and injured soldiers were suffering from trench fever, nephritis, neuritis and shellshock.

 

Before the war began, the General Hospital had three physicians, two assistant physicians, four surgeons and two assistant surgeons. Of these, one physician, one surgeon and one assistant physician were members of the Territorial Force, were called up at the outbreak of war. The other assistant physician joined up soon and afterwards. Six nurses were called up immediately and others followed. Many of the doctors in the city joined up and those remaining did their work. The normal residence staff was then just three house surgeons and two house physicians. As Dr Frank Jacob recalls in A History of the General Hospital: soon these were reduced to three: ‘Next we had one man as senior house surgeon and three women doctors. They all did excellent work.’

 

Nottingham General Hospital, Personal Reflections, 1991, John Bittiner and David Lowe

 

Wounded Soldiers, World War One, Jubilee Wing, Nottingham General Hospital

Huts used as temporary wards to accommodate wounded soldiers during World War One

Wounded Soldiers on the Terrace

Thornton House, The Ropewalk, Nottingham: The Thornton family house in the Ropewalk was given to the hospital and the Red Cross provided additional equipment and nurses.

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